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Egyptian Ahmed Gabr Breaks World Records for Deepest Sea Dive

Egyptian Ahmed Gabr Breaks World Records for Deepest Sea Dive

In the crystal clear waters of the Red Sea, off the coast of Dahab, South Sinai, Egypt. The former Egyptian army officer Ahmed Gabr become a part of the world’s diving history on Friday 18 September 2014 at 12:20 am, almost 14 hours after his entry at 10:30am the previous morning.

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Gaber has been planning his extreme dive which considered a real feat of human endurance for 2 years with his team at the H2O Divers diving center in Dahab. Smashing the previous record by South African diver Nuno Gomes who reached the depth of 318.25 meters in 2005, was Gabr’s dream for 4 years.

Training on the deco ladder

Training on the deco ladder

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Ahmed Gabr 200 metre dive from H2O Divers Dahab on Vimeo.

Ahmed Gaber Official Guinness World Record

Ahmed Gaber Official Guinness World Record

His training regiment includes physical and mental preparedness achieved through activities such as cardiovascular and meditation exercises. Regular diving using deep air and Trimix tanks is helping Ahmed to push past the deepest depths of the Sea reached by man.

14  hours, 90 tanks, a team of 14 international divers, and an incredible dose of courage: that’s what it took Egyptian diver Ahmer Gabr to break the Guiness World Record in deep sea diving, after going 332.35m under the water.

Guinness World Records has announced that Egyptian diver Ahmed Gabr is the new title holder for deepest salt water scuba dive, at 332.35 metres.

“Record breakers are special, they are the best, ever, at what they do,” Talal Omar, the Guinness World Records representative for the Middle East announced as he handed Gabr his title certificate aboard the MV Aeolos.

“This is an extremely risky project, especially considering the jump from the deepest training dive of 220m to 350m. This means covering 130m of unknown physiological and psychological hyperbaric effects,” diving specialist Dr. Anke Fabian said through her Facebook page.

 

Gabr, in high spirits, warmly thanked his team and walked out onto the jetty where he was welcomed by a cheering crowd.

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